Student sells 31 Bits’ jewelry to help suffering women

Temple junior Micah Arnold sells jewelry hand-made by women in Uganda to provide their families with an income. Photo credit: Trey Honeycutt

By Lauren Friederman, Reporter

Accessories have the ability to empower. This is true for Temple junior Micah Arnold, who said she sees her job as the perfect opportunity to serve two of her passions simultaneously.

International company 31 Bits sells jewelry handmade by women in Uganda, both online and by way of representatives. The women who make the jewelry go through a five-year program that encourages empowerment and fosters them as productive members of their community.

“I’ve always had a heart for mission, but I’m also studying fashion merchandising,” Arnold said.

Arnold began working as a campus representative for 31 Bits in August after hearing about the company from her sister. As a campus representative, she sells 31 Bits’ jewelry to students and Wacoans.

Arnold said her favorite part about her job is that she is able to help women suffering from poverty in Uganda.

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Temple junior Micah Arnold sells jewelry hand-made by women in Uganda to provide their families with an income. Photo credit: Trey Honeycutt

“There’s a bigger purpose than just selling jewelry,” Arnold said.

The money from the jewelry sales benefits the women in Uganda who craft the jewelry out of recycled paper.

“[Working for 31 Bits] teaches them life skills that they can teach to their kids,” Arnold said.

31 Bits empowers women by teaching them to work hard to earn an income, a work ethic that they can pass on to their children, Arnold said.

Most of the pieces range from $12 to $60, and Arnold sells a variety of jewelry from bracelets to necklaces.

“A lot of people like it when they realize that it’s for a good cause and they hear the story behind it,” Arnold said.

San Angelo junior Grace Wallace said she liked the jewelry before she knew that the proceeds went to help women in Uganda.

“At first I had no idea that it was for a good cause,” Wallace said.

Working for 31 Bits has helped steer Arnold toward a specific career path, she said.

“I think I would like working in the U.S., but I think I would like working [in Uganda] more,” Arnold said. “So if someday that’s what I’m called to do, then that would be awesome.”

Arnold said she is interested in fashion-oriented nonprofits and hopes to pursue something in that career field.

Arnold said she will host a trunk show to sell the jewelry from 3 to 6 p.m. Nov. 6 at 1215 Wood Ave.

For more information on 31 Bits or to see their jewelry, find them online at 31bits.com.

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